Bondage

 

bondageGet to know the ropes. Or chains. Get to know your cuffs, police-issued or otherwise. A few knots will serve you well. Eleven percent of U.S. men and 17 percent of U.S. women report they’ve participated in bondage — are you one of them? Are you interested?

Being tied up, tied down, helpless — for some, that’s the attraction. Often, a blindfold is part of the scene. Having your choice taken away, by choice, can empower you. You can have your partner play out your wildest dreams — whatever those are, from tickling to excruciating pain — and you can’t stop the action. (Except with a safeword.)

Being immobilized might be the attraction. Quiet, serene, protected. Still. You can lie for hours in sensory deprivation, left alone with your thoughts, awaiting your partner’s return, traveling inward, the extreme monastery of the mind. That can be the appeal.

Or you can be the one tying up the other. You can make of your partner’s helplessness an elaborate design, in the Japanese fashion. Or you can simply get the job done — make your partner powerless, easily bent to your will. Squirming against the bonds — a decoration, a privation, a pleasure.